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The Muse in the Machine: Computerizing the Poetry of Human Thought

By (author) David Gelernter





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Can we introduce emotion into the computer? David Gelernter, one of the leading lights in artificial intelligence today, begins The Muse in the Machine with this provocative question. In providing an answer, he not only points to a future revolution in computers but radically changes our views of the human mind itself. Bringing together insights from computer science, cognitive psychology, philosophy of mind, and literary theory, David Gelernter presents what is sure to be a much debated view of how humans have thought, how we think today, and how computers will learn to think in the future.

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Normally shipped | Enquiries only
Publisher | Simon & Schuster
Published date | 2 Dec 1993
Language |
Format | Hardback
Pages | 220
Dimensions | 240 x 160 x 23mm (L x W x H)
Weight | 1g
ISBN | 978-0-0291-1602-9
Readership Age |
BISAC | computers / artificial intelligence


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